31Aug

What I can expect with 1 vs 2 photographers

By, August 31, 2020

While we typically always suggest 2 photographers, we also understand that based off our clients preference for coverage or for budget purposes, 1 photographer may make the most sense for your event. We have a couple of tips to ensure we are set up for success to provide you with the coverage you are expecting.

As we all know, one person cannot be in two places at the same time, so it will be important to understand what can and can’t be covered. Then, once you decide which portion you would like to have covered, it will be important to share that with your lead photographer. The key is to make sure everyone is on the same page with the same understanding before the big event versus after.

Pre-Ceremony – If you have a bridal party and are not doing a first look, it will be important to choose which side the lead photographer will cover. Or, as a work around, if the lead photographer is given an ample (typically 2+ hours) amount of time before the ceremony he/she can move from one location to the next, to cover both sets of the bridal party. If you are doing a first look, then both sides can be covered beforehand, again, assuming there is a good buffer of time (avg – 2.5 hours before ceremony).

Ceremony – It is important to note that although the photographer will be moving swiftly he/she will need to choose certain moments and angles to cover. For example: When you are first walking down the aisle, there may not be time to capture a reaction shot. We will, of course, do our very best. As well, the photographer will be more focused on the two of you, which means there will be less family/friend reaction shots overall.

Cocktail Hour – During the cocktail hour we are typically photographing the family portraits, bridal party and couples portraits. If we are capturing these images and that is our focus, there will most likely be no cocktail hour pictures of the guests or details of the reception area. As a work around, if you are wanting this covered, doing a first look or scheduling your cocktail hour for 90 minutes would be the solution.

Reception – During the reception our goal is typically to capture the key events while also getting reaction shots. We try to get everyone in the room photographed as we assume people have traveled from many different places. We just ask that it is understood that there will most likely be less guest reaction shots and we may not get everyone captured in a picture, as our main focus will be on the two of you. If there is a special group of people that you want to ensure is captured, it will be important to share that with your lead photographer and set aside time.

If you decide you would like to add a second photographer, please go to your Account Login and you can add it there. Thanks!

14Aug

Stress-Free Family Wedding Portraits

By, August 14, 2020

During your wedding planning, you may likely wonder how to successfully prepare for family photos. With the right formula, family photos can be a smooth process, no matter how big your family is!

Here are the steps we take on our end to ensure your family portraits are a success:

  1. Your photographer sets up a call, typically a month before your wedding day to learn more about your family. We understand that every family is different, so your lead photographer will do their best to understand all of the dynamics before the big day.
  2. On the wedding day itself, there is a systematic and organized process. The process often starts with taking a large group photo of one side of the family (typically the bride’s side first). The photographer will then say something like, “please raise your hand if you are cousins. :)” Once hands are raised the photographer will tell those folks to go enjoy cocktail hour and will ask everyone else to stay. Another picture will be taken. The next announcement may be “Aunts and Uncles, you’re all set and can head to cocktail hour.” What is left at this point is your immediate family, their spouses and any grandparents.  As the crowd is narrowed down, we are able to capture more intimate groupings, such as grandparents, parents and siblings. This method ensures that everyone is photographed.  This same process will be repeated with the groom’s side of the family.

Here are the steps you can take on your end to ensure success: VERY IMPORTANT! Continue Reading →

31Dec

Planning the Ceremony | Wedding Tips

By, December 31, 2017

When planning the wedding ceremony, one big decision is, “What time should we start?” Because the ceremony time dictates the schedule for the rest of the day, there are several factors to consider.

1. Sunset. Sunset time is one of the most important things to consider! As a general rule, the ceremony should start well before sunset, and end at least one hour before the sun goes down. This ensures that you will still have quality light after the ceremony, which is important for romantic portraits together, as well as family photos.

2. Reception. Length of the reception is another thing to consider. An earlier ceremony start time gives room for a nice long party afterwards :) You’ll want to leave plenty of time to accommodate dinner, dancing, and any other traditions/event you want to include.

3. Venue Rules. Most venues have a mandatory end time. Your venue may also have a strict ceremony time. If your venue’s required ceremony window is less than one hour before sunset, you might want to consider doing a “first look.” This will allow the majority of the couple’s portraits and wedding party photos to be done before the ceremony, and ensure that you have beautiful photos in the best available light.

If you have specific questions about your wedding ceremony, and how it will pertain to your photography timeline, please feel free to contact us!

Check out more amazing wedding ceremony photos captured by our studio.